Ten big ideas from TED

via cnn.com

great list of ideas!

excerpt from CNN:

Here are 10 big ideas from TED2010, which concludes Saturday:

$60K a year can make you happy

Psychologist and Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman says millions of dollars won't buy you happiness, but a job that pays $60,000 a year might help.

Happiness levels increase up to the $60K mark, but "above that it's a flat line," he said.

"Money does not buy you experiential happiness but lack of money certainly buys you misery," he said. But the real trick, Kahneman said, is to spend time with people you like.

Save the world through games

Jane McGonigal, a game designer, says playing online video games gives people "superpowers" that help them improve the real world.

We currently spend a collective 3 billion hours a week playing online games, she said, but we need to spend seven times that much time doing so to make sure we're up to real-world challenges.

"My goal for the next decade is to try to make it as easy to save the world in real life as it is to save the world in online games," she said. To do so, she develops social games that merge the real-world challenges with online gaming.

Anonymity promotes honesty

Christopher "Moot" Poole runs one of the seedier corners of the Internet. His site, called 4chan, is known as a den of porn, hacking and anonymous rants.

But Poole, a 22-year-old college student, says 4chan also protects its users privacy and promotes honest discourse. Without names in the way, people can focus on ideas, he said.

"It's anonymous and it has no memory. There's no archive. There are no barriers. There is no registration," he said of the site. "That's led to this discussion that's completely raw, completely unfiltered."

We can end slavery

Kevin Bales, founder of a group called Free the Slaves, said he was surprised to learn slavery still existed when he read a pamphlet saying just that.

Now he's on a crusade to end modern slavery, which he says is every bit as bad as the type of slavery that preceded the U.S. Civil War. Some 27 million people are enslaved today; and a person in some parts of India can be sold into slavery for about $5, he said.

But awareness and action could abolish slavery for good in 25 years, he says.

Moral ideas are right or wrong, not both

Writer Sam Harris -- who is perhaps best known as a stern critic of organized religion -- says we use science to prove or disprove hypotheses, and we should similarly use evidence to say some activities are moral and others are not.

"Why does every opinion have to count? Why does every culture have a point of view worth considering? Does the Taliban have a point of view on physics worth considering: No."

'What we eat is really our chemotherapy three times a day'

William Li, president and medical director of The Angiogenesis Foundation, which focuses on the connection between blood vessel growth and aggressive cancers. There are 11 FDA-approved drugs that inhibit growth of blood vessels that sustain cancers, but Li pointed out that there are a number of foods and beverages that could offer substances that accomplish the same thing -- and could help prevent cancer.

"Men who consume two to three servings of cooked tomatoes per week have a 40 to 50 percent reduction in risk for prostate cancer," he said.

Red grapes, strawberries, soybeans, dark chocolate, oranges, and green tea are among the foods with the ability to prevent blood vessel growth.

The ukulele can stop war

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro says his traditional, Hawaiian instrument, which he learned to play at age 4, can make the world a less violent place.

"I've always believed it's the instrument of peace," he said, "because if everyone played the ukulele, this would be a much more peaceful place."

Shimabukuro says people can't help but smile when they hear the two-octave, stringed instrument. He likened its tone to the sound of children laughing.

$28 billion mostly wasted on placebos

Holding up bottles of herbal supplements, writer Michael Specter spoke out against what he sees as a growing rejection of science. He says it's resulted in parents refusing to vaccinate their children due to an unfounded connection to autism and people shunning genetically modified foods that have the potential of helping the world fight increasing hunger.

The herbs, he said accomplish one thing: "They darken your urine. You want to pay $28 billion for dark urine? That's OK."

'Stop politicians doing stupid things that spread HIV'

Elizabeth Pisani, epidemiologist who has studied drug abusers and sex workers who are involved in the spread of HIV-AIDS, said nations that have followed former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's example by creating programs to provide sterile needles to drug abusers are much more successful in curbing the spread of the disease.

Nations such as the United States that have resisted such programs have seen higher spread of the disease among drug users who share needles.

Every eight days, the toll of a Haiti quake

Esther Duflo, a professor in MIT's economics department, said, that every day, 25,000 children die of preventable causes, adding up every eight days to the approximate death toll of the Haiti earthquake. Though $2 billion has been pledged for the Haiti earthquake, Duflo asks why we don't make the same level of commitment to prevent the daily death toll of children.

Amid the conference's many ideas, one thing is clear -- the joy speakers experienced in having a receptive audience to share their deepest thoughts and feelings.

David Cameron noted that politics has been called "show business for ugly people." TED2010, in some ways, is summer camp for brainy ones.

Muslim Group issues fatwa against full body scanners -- unfortunately, this is not a link to the Onion.

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Saying that body scanners violate Islamic law, Muslim-American groups are supporting a %u201Cfatwa%u201D %u2013 a religious ruling %u2013 that forbids Muslims from going through the scanners at airports.

The Fiqh Council of North America %u2013 a body of Islamic scholars that includes some from Michigan %u2013 issued a fatwa this week that says going through the airport scanners would violate Islamic rules on modesty.

%u201CIt is a violation of clear Islamic teachings that men or women be seen naked by other men and women,%u201D reads the fatwa issued Tuesday. %u201CIslam highly emphasizes haya (modesty) and considers it part of faith. The Quran has commanded the believers, both men and women, to cover their private parts.%u201D

The decision could complicate efforts to intensify screening of potential terrorists who are Muslim. After the Christmas Day bombing attempt in Detroit by a Muslim suspect from Nigeria, some have called for the use of body scanners at airports to find explosives and other dangerous materials carried by terrorists. Some airports are now in the process of buying and using the body scanners, which show in graphic detail the outlines of a person%u2019s body.

But Muslim groups say the scanners go against their religion. One option offered to passengers who don%u2019t want to use the scanners would be a pat down by a security guard. The Muslim groups are urging members to undergo those instead.

Two members of the Fiqh Council are from Michigan, Imam Hassan Qazwini of the Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, and Imam Ali Suleiman Ali of the Canton Mosque. %u201CFiqh%u201D means Islamic jurisprudence.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, which has a chapter in Michigan, says it endorses the fatwa.

%u201CWe support the Fiqh Council%u2019s statement on full-body scanners and believe that the religious and privacy rights of passengers can
be respected while maintaining safety and security,%u201D said Nihad Awad, national executive director of CAIR.

Currently, there are 40 full-body scanners at 19 airports in the U.S., including two of them in Detroit, said spokesman Jim Fotenos of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). There are plans for 450 more body scanners in U.S. airports, he said.

a look at $/active on chinese social gaming networks

basically doing around .002 $/active (using our methodology for calculation).

btw, i don't know if i believe that last sentence -- it claims fb apps are making $1/DAU/Month.  with our methodology, this implies .03 $/active on a daily basis.  zynga has about 230 MILLION MAU.... and 65 Million DAU as reported here:

http://statistics.allfacebook.com/developers/single/zynga/27/

this implies $2M a day in revenue for zynga.  or $700M/year...

 

here are the links/excerpts:

http://www.insidesocialgames.com/2010/02/11/chinas-social-gaming-ecosystem-weak-financial-incentives-new-market-entry/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+InsideSocialGames+%28Inside+Social+Games%29

On China’s social networking platforms, the number of visitors to apps is high and daily active users (DAU) are comparable to some of the most popular games on Facebook. The developer Five Minutes’ Happy Farm is seeing around 23 million DAUs while Zynga’s FarmVille is currently enjoy 27 million DAU according to our most recent numbers from AppData. Despite these promising traffic numbers, the average revenue per user (ARPU) remains very weak. One source reports that a game with 100,000 DAUs will bring in around $5,000 USD per month. That would calculate out to around $0.06 / DAU / month. For reference, many games on Facebook are making under $1 / DAU / month, with a few of the stronger games surpassing the $1 threshold.